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Some Information & Tips To Help You Make Informed Decisions
I've been working on a large variety of projects to aide in the manufacturing process of many items. From 3D printing and casting to milling and turning. Many of my projects require that I know a good amount of info. I figured I would pass along the bits that were particularly helpful for me in the event that they may be helpful for you. I can't take any credit for putting these charts together, but I have edited them to be easier to read (for me at least), by adding borders, alternating row colors, writing out the full name where it was originally the elemental symbol, etc. It's been hugely helpful to me and I hope it can be for you as well. Be safe. Be smart. Have fun.

Comparing Different Metals Conductivity Vs Copper

Different metals conduct electricity at different rates. While that statement seems blatantly obvious, the rates at which they differ is far from obvious. The one that sticks in my mind is that although brass is composed of 70% copper and 30% zinc, it conducts only 28% the amount of electricity that copper conducts. In other words, by simply not alloying it with zinc, and instead just making a solid copper part 70% of the original size, it would still conduct 250% of the amount of electricity as the original part. As a result, I can't understand why one wouldn't make, say a distribution block, out of straight copper instead of brass. Even if it uses the same amount of copper as would be used in the zinc (therefore saving the material cost of zinc and alloying labor cost), the performance increase is HUGE. And who wouldn't want a substantial performance boost in their circuit? I can't wrap my head around it... But here's a quick little chart to show how well most common metals compare to copper. Just click on it to enlarge.

Comparison of Wire Gauges Size & Conductivity

Depending on the circuit, we use all sorts off different wire sizes to get the performance we're looking for. However, if you're like me, you've probably accumulated a collection of different gauge wires. But there's always the chance that the circuit requires a wire size you don't have - maybe even a wire size that's difficult to find (for example 4AWG or bigger magnet wire). In which case, you'll want to figure out how to combine wires you do have in order to carry that larger current. This chart will help you to understand the capability of different sizes, enabling you to do just that. Click to enlarge.

Comparing Different Solder Compounds Electrical & Thermal Conductivity

If you're creating or repairing circuits, you're either doing a good amount of soldering - or you're doing it wrong. I'll never claim to be an expert - on the contrary this hobby is the deepest rabbit hole that I've ever been down. Every time I figure something out, I discover 5 more things that I need to figure out. An amateur joint is all but guaranteed to be worse than the same joint made in a factory. Because of this, if I can make up some of the ground I lost by using the right kind of solder, I'm going to try to do that. How it melts, flows, and bonds all matter too. But that's primarily opinion as long as you have a good iron. But this chart at lest gives you solid test resuts for a wide range of solder formulas. Take a look and see where to start.

Comparing Different Metals Conductivity Vs Copper

Different metals conduct electricity at different rates. While that statement seems blatantly obvious, the rates at which they differ is far from obvious. The one that sticks in my mind is that although brass is composed of 70% copper and 30% zinc, it conducts only 28% the amount of electricity that copper conducts. In other words, by simply not alloying it with zinc, and instead just making a solid copper part 70% of the original size, it would still conduct 250% of the amount of electricity as the original part. As a result, I can't understand why one wouldn't make, say a distribution block, out of straight copper instead of brass. Even if it uses the same amount of copper as would be used in the zinc (therefore saving the material cost of zinc and alloying labor cost), the performance increase is HUGE. And who wouldn't want a substantial performance boost in their circuit? I can't wrap my head around it... But here's a quick little chart to show how well most common metals compare to copper. Just click on it to enlarge.

Comparison of Wire Gauges Size & Conductivity

Depending on the circuit, we use all sorts off different wire sizes to get the performance we're looking for. However, if you're like me, you've probably accumulated a collection of different gauge wires. But there's always the chance that the circuit requires a wire size you don't have - maybe even a wire size that's difficult to find (for example 4AWG or bigger magnet wire). In which case, you'll want to figure out how to combine wires you do have in order to carry that larger current. This chart will help you to understand the capability of different sizes, enabling you to do just that. Click to enlarge.

Gas Welding & Cutting Pressures For Different Tips

Pretty self-explanatory. For most (specifically Harris-type in this situation) Oxy-Acetylene gas welding/cutting torches, this chart should give you a good idea as to what pressures to use with which tips for what thickness of steel you're working on. Like the others, just click for enlarged version.