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Cyclone Dust Collector
The Ingredients...
The Process...
This project honestly began by accident. I had so many things that I was working on that I didn't really have any desire to add another project into the mix. I was at the local thrift shop looking for inspiration (thrift shops SUCK if you go looking for one specific thing. But if you have an open mind, you can find some real treasures) and stumbled across a cyclone vacuum for $1. It was beat to shit but I didn't care. In reality, I bought it for the power switch. But saved all of the components that I thought could be of some use later down the line. Recently I decided to put my shop through a deep clean and organize it. I was pitching a lot of items I deemed "not immediately useful" and came to the vacuum parts (some hoses from other vacuums that were given to me. Almost as if it was divine intervention, I saw a cyclone dust collector on Amazon and then used the last chlorine that came in a 5gal bucket. So i figured "why not?" And got moving on it. I went and picked up a PVC fitting for like $0.70, cut out a hole in the top of the bucket lid and placed the PVC in it and then put the cyclone piece on top of that and lifted the lid off the ground to see how far into the lid I needed to attach the PVC for the tube inside the cyclone to seal up against the lip on the inside of the PVC and marked the PVC so I could epoxy it in place. After the epoxy fully cured, I cut down the PVC so it was out of the way but still performed the function that I bought it for. Then I put the cyclone, while snapped into the vacuum body, on top and marked where the vacuum body sat (the cyclone is slightly shorther in height) and then cut the marked part out of the lid. Then I epoxied the vacuum body into the lid. This way I am able to remove the cyclone with just the push of a button. I added silicone to the inner lip of the PVC pipe, as well as on the bottom of the exit tube on the cyclone so that they form a good seal when attached. And then put weather stripping on the bottom edge of the cyclone outer wall to make a strong seal there as well. I came across 4 casters from another cannibalized item that I decided to add. At this point the dust collector was almost done. All that's left is to install an outlet that I'll hook up the vacuum into. Looking around, this factor seems important and has a significant impact on how well the dust collector works. So I'm going to take my time here to make sure I know what I'm doing and get it right rather than make all of my work useless. In the meantime though, I'm looking into how to add in another motor to basically turbocharge the power. To this point, the PVC fitting is the only thing I've had to purchase for this build. But since it's mostly made up of the vacuum, I'll include that cost as well. Right now this cyclone dust collector has cost me $1.70. Can't whine about that.