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***SCRAPPED***
First the full bridge rectifier was bad. And though it did work in AC when I briefly tested it, it was extremely difficult to try to rebuild inside the same case. Which means trying to build the DC circuit back into it once the replacement FBR arrives would be a real pain. Plus, I do plan on adding a power control circuit. So I need a new case. I tore it all apart and started over... Also, I may go with three transformers rather than 2. I will try to get a good video of the process...

DC Stick Welder & Arc Furnace From MOT
The Ingredients...
The Process...
              Break apart your transformers by cutting along the seam and remove the high voltage secondaries, you can absolutely destroy the secodary coils, but you want the primary coils in as pristine of a condition possible. How you accomplish this is up to you. Once done clean the transformer cores up. Now wind your secondary coils (it's wise to make a bobbin to wind your wire around that you can slip it off after) with the 10AWG wire (I bought ground wire because it was about 35% cheaper just because of different color insulation). Mine took some adjusting with a mallet and vise to fit perfectally. Using metal extra strength epoxy, I reattached it all. Securing it on each side with band clamps typically used for automobile hoses. I then applied VERY liberal coats of coil dope made of packing styrofoam and Toluene and Xylene (do NOT use Acetone. It evaporates too quickly and ends up with a consistency that is entirely useless. I believe Toluene works the best, but just barely better than Xylene. So close in fact, that it may be just a placebo effect on my perception. I ran out of Toluene and just mixed in Xylene in order to make the amount that I wanted). I cut an old circuit board that I cannibalized to fit on the top of the frame with the capacitors attached to the underside with 4g cable going from the transformers into a distribution block cut in half and wired in reverse (it was one block with 2 0g inputs and 4 4g outputs. It's now 2 blocks with 2 4g inputs and 1 0g output each.

Using an old Uninterruptable Power Supply case for the welder case, I attached a handle from a microwave to the top of the case using epoxy and screws. At this point, my welding cable jacke and plugs were delivered. After attaching them to the metal front plate, it became clear that I needed to modify the plastic faceplate in order to make the case look like an actual welder built by an adult. So I cut out something like 75-80% of the faceplate, leaving pretty much only the outer frame of the faceplate and then permanently attaching it to the front metal plate with epoxy and then blending them together with bondo while leaving space to attach the jacks. After sanding and forming the front, I realized there was a slight uneven gap where the jacks go. So I grabbed a few o-rings and ground out grooves in the jacks to help in keeping them in place while keeping a low profile. From here I sprayed the case components with primer and sanded the front panel until it was smooth and I liked how it looked.

Due to the fact that this project is among my earliest, I'm in a horrible position to test it, resulting in a significant delay in it's finishing. As this was nearing completion, I was able to finish my isolation transformer, as well as my DC lab power supply. And these completions allowed me to better test the stick welder components, as well as slowly charge up the capacitor bank. Moment of truth time... I hooked up the first transformer to a power cord, plugged it into a power strip switched off, closed my eyes and prayed to the circuit Gods and switched it on. My lights stayed on, so I was off to a good start. But I couldn't hear it. Leaned closer and it was just quietly humming. Tested at 27v. Round 2. Nearly identical results. Only the voltage was 26.4v. All things considered, this was FAR better than I had hoped. My electrode holders were delivered as well (a total of 3, 1 for welding and 2 for my arc furnace). They looked and felt super cheap. Because they are super cheap. $11 each overnight at my door. The opening for the cable was far bigger than I need/want. But I can double up my solution for this problem on the plugs and it works out surprisingly nicely. I'm also finishing up the case, which was hard to smooth out completely because I tried filling uneven spots with Liquid Nails and it's too soft sanding and made things worse. But I've about recovered and should finish tonight.

Long story short, I discovered how awfully brass conducts in comparison to copper and got OCD about trying to find a way to get/make copper jacks and plugs. So far I've had no luck. I'm not going to quit pursuing this, and will likely cast/machine my own after I finish building my new and improved foundry currently under way. I can't understand where it seemed like a good idea to make these jacks of brass instead of copper (brass conducts 28% as well as copper), and if the temperature doesn't get crazy at the jacks, aluminum is even a better choice. But I'm going to continue with the brass for now, but will hopefully add better jacks shortly after. The last thing I need is to bottleneck the power on a homemade welder. So I'm trying to smash through this bottleneck. But for now, it's  time to finish the rest of it, run it to 2 separate 120V outlets out of phase to make it about the equivalent of running it to a 240V outlet.
Now I'm just about done with this build (I thought I was done. I should be done but there were some complications). Here's some updated pics. I will have more when  it's officially finished as well.
Major checkpoint #1: It can weld. Major issue #1-27: The full bridge rectifier doesn't work. And as a result... It blew the capacitor bank. So now it's not a DC welder at all. Seems to work quite smoothly as an AC welder with 6013 rods though. So I'm not completely crushed (yet). I still want a DC stick welder though. Hopefully when I contact the seller of the rectifier, they'll replace it. But, though upon receiving, I've only slapped some thermal grease on it and attached it to a heatsink, never actually using it, But I did buy it a few months ago (because I'm impatient and dumb). So I'm not expecting much, but lately I've been pleasantly surprised with most sellers that I had an issue with their product(s). So hopefully I am again. I haven't even taken any measurements yet of current/voltage/etc. I did get a couple videos that will be online shortly. But anyways, I'm gonna upload this and get back to work on it. Updates coming soon...